10 Solargraph photos you may not have seen before

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Solargraph Photos – Low tech // Long exposure photography

Every now and then something comes along in the world of photography, which really catches the eye, so to speak. With the current race in technology for ever-increasing mega pixels and mega bytes it is refreshing to find creativity at the other end of the spectrum.

Solargraphy what?

Enter Solargraphy. This type of phtography uses home made cameras – tin cans with pinholes and photographic paper, strapped to a fixed point for a given amount of time. With no big financial outlay, the only thing you need to start taking solargraphs is patience, and it’s not unusual to find exposures of 6 or 12 months. During this time, the home made camera captures each path the sun takes, resulting in some extraordinary effects – think a still time lapse.

Who does it?

Aficionados of the scene include Justin Quinnell – who has famously captured the Bristol suspension bridge and other sites around Bristol. There are many others, and capturing famous landmarks is a popular goal amongst the solargraph circles.

How to get started

Starting out in solargraphy is easy. Here’s how to make the camera:

1. Take a tin can or film case, and make a hole in the side with scissors. If using a can remove the top with a sharp knife and keep for later.
2. Paint the inside of the can black to avoid any reflections
3. Take a square of aluminum foil and tape securely across the hole in the can.
4. With a pin, create a tiny pinhole in the foil
5. In a darkroom or darkened room, place a piece of photography paper inside the can and replace the top of the can, taping shut.
6. Cover the pinhole with a larger piece of foil and tape shut.
7. Find a suitable home for your new camera, preferably outside with a good vantage point so as to capture the path of the sun.
8. Tape securely to a tree or other fixed object.
9. Now remove the second foil.
10. Come back in 6 months!

Below you can see our top ten solargraphs.

Solargraphy

Solargraphy

Solargraphy

Solargraphy

Solargraphy

Solargraphy

Solargraphy

Solargraphy

Solargraphy

Solargraphy

 

Photo credits: Regina Valkenborgh, Jesus Joglar, Justin Quinnell, Jan Koeman, Dirìego Lopez Calvin, Kutas, Boris Pophristov, Philippus Lansberg

 

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